• Homestead Animals

    A Goat Birth Story

    The One Hour Homestead is happy to introduce our newest goat kid!  This adorable little doeling was born on May 8.  Although this was our fifth kidding, it was the first one I was able to watch–so exciting, nerve-wracking and just…amazing.  For details of the goat birth story read along below. I was expecting Marmalade to kid between days 145-150 of gestation.  She held out until the last minute.  I began checking on her every few hours when I was home and coming home for lunch to do mid-day checks once we reached this window of expected delivery.  Finally, when the big day came, I noticed some signs of labor…

  • photo of purple and pink Easter Egg radishes
    Homestead Log

    Weekly Homestead Log–5/6/18

    Here is this week’s log of time spent and rewards gained on the One Hour Homestead: Routine Animal Chores Morning chores–10 minutes x 7 = 1:10 Evening chores–5 minutes x 7 = :35 Gardening Water seedlings–5 minutes x 3 = :15 Plant seed potatoes, beets, green beans, carrots, lettuce and snap peas = 2:00 Transplant lettuce, kale, collards, broccoli, chard, parsley, leeks = 1:30 Fence garden = :20 Disassemble mini hoop house = :10 Other Projects Stare at the goat who still has not given birth = 1:30…at least Clean and prepare milking machine = :30 Total Week’s Time 8:00–surpassed one hour per day Results 1 dozen duck eggs 6 dozen…

  • photo of goat
    Homestead Animals

    Play the Guessing Game–When Will the Goat Kid?

    For mini goats, such as ours, kidding usually occurs between days 145-150 of gestation.  For Marmalade, this year’s dates are between May 3 and May 8.  Or, any time now. Signs a Doe is Getting Close to Kidding Her udder will fill up.  For my goats, this starts about a month before kidding.  Their udders slowly bag up, but a day or so before kidding, it seems to almost double in size Her tail ligaments relax.  Ligaments on either side of the doe’s tail head soften in preparation for easing the kids through the birthing canal.  In the day or so before birth, they seem to almost disappear.  These can…

  • photo of compost from deep litter
    Garden,  Homestead Animals

    Deep Litter Benefits

    This is the stuff gardeners dream about.  It can be elusive and expensive, but it is so rich, and I always want more.  Black gold.  Or you may know it as…compost.  There are many ways to make or procure compost, but one of the easiest is to collect the final product of a winter’s worth of deep litter from the animals in the barn and chicken coop. Managing animal waste is an issue to consider when adding animals to the homestead.  The small homesteader tries to minimize the amount of inputs to their farm in order to decrease cost, time and effort.  For example, each trip to the garden center…

  • Homestead Log

    Weekly Homestead Log–4/29/18

    Here is this week’s log of time spent and rewards gained on the One Hour Homestead: Routine Animal Chores Morning chores–10 minutes x 7 = 1:10 Evening chores–5 minutes x 7 = :35 Gardening Water seedlings–5 minutes x 2 = :10 Burn planting holes in landscape fabric = :30 Plant 200 onion sets/plants = 1:35 Replant onion sets — :15 Water and weed mini hoop house = :15 Other Projects Repair of chicken pen (damaged in winter storm) = :30 Final preparations for kidding pen (clean, fresh shavings, etc.) = :20 Total Week’s Time 5:20   Results 1 dozen duck eggs 6 dozen chicken eggs

  • Homestead Log

    Weekly Homestead Log–4/22/18

    Here is this week’s log of time spent and rewards gained on the One Hour Homestead: Routine Animal Chores Morning chores–10 minutes x 7 = 1:10 Evening chores–5 minutes x 7 = :35 Gardening Water seedlings–5 minutes x 2 = :10 Lay out landscape fabric and drip tape in garden = 1:05 Move seedlings back out to mini greenhouse = :10 Pot up 120 tomato and pepper seedlings into larger containers = 1:45 Water and weed mini hoop house = :15 Total Week’s Time 5:10  (ramping up, but still less than one hour per day)   Results 1 dozen duck eggs 6 dozen chicken eggs  

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    Homestead Animals

    Broody Hen Fail–Breaking Broody

    If it looks she is in jail, well, that’s not too far off. The broody chicken was doing a good job for a week and a half of the three week incubation period. Locked up safely in the dog crate, she sat on the 10 eggs which were piled up toward the rear of the crate. It seemed that she would get up once or twice a day for just a few minutes, to eat, drink and relieve herself, but then she was right back to keeping those eggs warm. I was worrying a bit…temperatures were in the mid-20’s at night and only 30’s during the day. A bit of…

  • Homestead Log

    Weekly Homestead Log–4/15/18

    Here is this week’s log of time spent and rewards gained on the One Hour Homestead: Routine Animal Chores Morning chores–10 minutes x 7 = 1:10 Evening chores–5 minutes x 7 = :35 Gardening Water seedlings–5 minutes x 2 = :10 Water seeds in mini hoop house = :05 Other Projects Barn cleaning = 1:15 Total Week’s Time 3:15 Additional Time Spent Complaining about the weather (when will spring get here so I can garden??)= 3:00+ Results 1 dozen duck eggs 6 dozen chicken eggs  

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    Garden,  One Hour Project

    Build a Mini Hoop House: A One Hour Project

    Mini Hoop House Project Do you have one hour to spare?  Has spring fever hit?  This simple project was the cure for me:  setting up a mini hoop house in the garden to start early spring vegetables.  Although it is still nearly six weeks until our last frost date here in northeast Ohio, I already have vegetable plants growing…outside! The secrets to starting an early spring garden are: choose cool weather crops that can tolerate light frosts raised beds planting under cover Cool Weather Crops Many garden favorites, such as tomatoes, peppers and zucchini cannot be planted outside until after the danger of frost has passed (around May 20 here).…

  • picture of bowl of chicken and noodles
    Recipes

    Homemade Egg Noodles

    The homestead husband has been craving and asking for homemade noodles “like mom used to make” for quite a while.  These were off the menu due to diet restrictions, however.  But, we are now in recovery from a gluten free diet, and with all of these eggs, I decided to give noodle making a whirl. Still suffering through a miserable cold spring (it snowed nearly every day through the first week in April), I decided chicken and noodles was on the menu.  First, one of our whole, frozen chickens was placed in the Instant Pot and cooked for 50 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare the noodles.  The ingredients are placed in a…